A Food Trip to Quezon Province: 11 Must-Try Delicacies for Foodies

What are the famous delicacies from Quezon Province?

Pancit Lucban Quezon Province Food photo via Depositphotos

Quezon Province Food Guide: 11 Must-Try Delicacies in Quezon Province

If there’s one place in the South that we recommend for foodies to visit, it would be Quezon Province. A 4-hour drive from Manila, this province is a one-stop destination for tourists who want to eat, relax, and shop, all at the same time.

Pancit Lucban Quezon Province Food photo via Depositphotos
Pancit Lucban Quezon Province Food photo via Depositphotos

For those who want to stick to a budget, don’t fret– Quezon Province is the place to be for a budget-friendly food trip. Here, we list the top 11 delicacies you must-try when you visit Quezon Province!

Pancit Habhab

Noodle fans will surely love Quezon Province’s own take on the classic pancit.

Pancit Lucban
Pancit Lucban

Pancit habhab is made with the local Lucban Miki noodles, which is a dried flour one. It somehow resembles that of pancit canton, but this one has a softer bite to it. To make the dish more flavorful, pancit habhab is mixed with vegetables such as carrots, chayote, pechay, and shrimp, and pork liver. It’s usually drizzled with vinegar to get that tangy flavor.

Their very own pancit habhab is not your ordinary noodles, not just because of its taste, but also of how it’s eaten, that is, sans the utensils. It’s served on a banana leaf which also serves as your utensil as you fold it, which then goes straight to your mouth as if you’re eating a sandwich!

Budin

Budin photo by Itsmorefuninthephilippines.com
Budin photo by Itsmorefuninthephilippines.com

A visit to the province wouldn’t be complete without trying their own native delicacies famous in most regions in the Philippines. In Quezon, they take pride in their budin, which is more commonly known as cassava cake.

Budin is made with fresh cassava, cheese, coconut milk, egg, and sugar. It’s the perfect panghimagas (dessert) to pair with coffee at the end of a sumptuous meal. This cassava cake is usually sliced triangularly like a pizza, making it easy to eat as a snack even when on the go! If you’re a fan of sweet, filling snacks, you’ve got to try one.

Lucban Longganisa

Lucban Longganisa
Lucban Longganisa

One of the first foods that come to mind when people hear of Quezon Province would be Lucban longganisa. Though many other provinces around the Philippines offer their own version of longganisa, Lucban’s take on it is very distinct due to its garlicky and sour flavor.

Normally served as a breakfast dish, this longganisa (Filipino-style sausages) is best paired with vinegar and atchara (pickled green papaya) on the side and eaten with sinangag (fried rice). Almost every market stall you go to often sells Lucban longganisa, so make sure to buy one for your relatives back home!

Puto Bao

Puto Bao photo via EverythingQuezon Fb page
Puto Bao photo via EverythingQuezon Fb page

At first glance, you’d think that puto bao is made with ube–but in reality, it’s actually a rice cake. This delicacy is made with glutinous rice filled with macapuno filling, which gives a nice, sweet surprise on the first bite. A purple food coloring is used to add a splash of color to the yummy native delicacy, which is enhanced by the fragrant smell it gives fresh off the steamer.

Puto Bao originates from Agdangan, Quezon, so make sure to go visit and try how this native snack is made in its hometown.

Hardinera

Hardinera from Quezon
Hardinera from Quezon

Hardinera, or Lucban hardinera, is a fiesta favorite among the locals of Quezon. This star dish can be classified as a meatloaf, only that this one is made with lots of flavors combined to create a beautiful and delicious dish perfect for special occasions.

Hardinera consists of pork giniling stewed in Menudo sauce, combined with flavorful ingredients such as liver spread, pepper, pineapple chunks, boiled eggs, raisin, and cheese. It’s served using a llanera, a container more commonly used in Leche flans. A bite of hardinera gives you a flavor-packed meal that can be eaten either hot or cold.

Pinais

Pinais photo by Esperidion Cabalsa via Tara na sa Lalawigan ng Quezon FB Page
Pinais photo by Esperidion Cabalsa via Tara na sa Lalawigan ng Quezon FB Page

Seafood takes the stage with pinais, another Quezon Province delicacy you wouldn’t want to miss. Freshwater shrimps are abundant in the area,, so this native delicacy is a popular dish for many locals.

Cooked in coconut milk, the shrimp is wrapped in banana leaves, then steamed, then grilled,, giving it a smoky flavor. It’s the perfect pair for rice with its creamy and flavorful sauce. Pinais has a pork dish version, too!

Minukmok

Nilupak
Nilupak

Originated in Tayabas, this dessert has an interesting story you should know about. It’s known to be a courtship ritual dish in the province, wherein the man would be able to spend time with the lady he’s courting and her family through this dish. The man will have to pound ingredients while the lady is expected to mix the minukmok with a huge spoon.

Superstitions say that if a man hits the lady’s hand with the pestle, they’re made for each other. Once the cooking’s over, the man shall present it to the lady’s parents, and if it’s good to the taste, he gets the sweet approval for courtship.

Minukmok is made from cassava, coconut strips, sugar, peanut, and sugar. It’s a delicious dessert that you know for sure it’s made with love.

Pinagong

Pinagong and pancit chami by James Sarmiento via Flickr CC
Pinagong and pancit chami by James Sarmiento via Flickr CC

Are you a bread person? If you are, then you’ve got to try Sariaya’s version of pastry. Called pinagong, this pastry’s namesake comes from the word pagong, which means turtle. It’s named so because of the shape of the bread and also how the texture of turtles are: hard on the outside, soft on the inside.

It’s best paired with coffee for a breakfast meal or an afternoon snack.

Yema Cake

Yema Cake
Yema Cake

Did you know that the first ever Yema Cake was introduced by a small bake shop in Tayabas called Rodillas? It’s now duplicated by various bakeshops all over the country but if you want to try the original, visit Tayabas City and try other local delicacies in Calle Budin.

If you’ve tried the yema candy before, then you’d surely love it in its pastry form–the yema cake. It’s a cult favorite among locals and those from neighboring provinces. Yema cake is made from sponge cake with yema frosting topped with a generous amount of cheese.

Sweet tooth foodies would definitely take another slice of this highly addicting dessert. Make sure to grab a box or two before heading home!

Pancit Chami

Pancit Chami by Bryboy317 via Flickr CC
Pancit Chami by Bryboy317 via Flickr CC

Last but definitely not the least on our list, is pancit chami. A native dish of Lucena, this noodle dish is made with Miki noodles topped with vegetables, squid balls, pork, and sometimes with a boiled egg. It has a sweet and spicy flavor that gives it a nice kick. It’s a very filling meal and a very delicious one at that!

Tikoy

Special Tikoy from Quezon photo via Campitas Food Product
Special Tikoy from Quezon photo via Campitas Food Product

Unlike the typical Chinese New Year Tikoy, this tikoy from Lucban, Tayabas, and the rest of Quezon is available all year round. This version of Tikoy is made from sticky rice and it has a sweet butter and caramel taste.

The best part about it is that it’s ready to eat and no need to fry.

Now, you’ve got 11 dishes to add on your Quezon Province foodie bucket list! Or, let us know in the comments whether you’ve tried any of these and suggest a stall or restaurant where others can try! Happy eating and enjoy the bountiful flavors of Quezon Province!

Searching for the best hotels, resorts, and affordable flights in the nearby Cities? Check out our list of affordable Quezon Province hotels and resorts via AgodaBooking, or you may also see available Airbnb properties in the city.

Want more updates about the best food trip spots and popular delicacies in Quezon Province, Philippines? Follow #TeamOutofTown, on FacebookTwitterInstagramBloglovin, and Pinterest for more travel ideas.

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