Unique Cemetery: The Sagada Hanging Coffins in Mountain Province, Philippines

The Hanging Coffins of Sagada is definitely one of the most popular tourist spot in Mountain Province. Visiting this old world burial site only involves a short hike but one thing more interesting is you will have to pass by an American influenced cemetery which is located on a hilltop called Echo Valley.

View from Echo Valley
View from Echo Valley

Trekking to the hilltop was a chilly and easy journey but seeing a Globe Telecom Cell Site right at the back of the Calvary replica was rather disappointing. After just a short walk down to the place called Echo Valley, the disappointment we had was eased after seeing the magnificent view of Sagada’s rocky village and the jaw-dropping view of the Hanging Coffins.


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Sagada Modern Cemetery

The path was not paved and the soil is naturally sticky and slippery so everyone decided not to continue the trek down to the nearest Hanging Coffin’s viewpoint, instead, everyone enjoyed shouting and cam-whoring in the valley. The place was not called Echo Valley for nothing, Its one of the few places in this world where shouting is allowed and apparently…. enjoyed.

Wild Flowers Sagada
Wild Flowers Sagada

I was not able to get a decent photo of the hanging coffins but seeing them from afar was a totally different experience.

Sagada Modern Cemetery
Sagada Modern Cemetery

Sagada Death Rituals

Hanging coffins are coffins which have been placed on Mountain cliffs as part of the Igorot indigenous culture and burial tradition of Sagada People. It may not be unique in the Philippines since these old tradition is also being done in some parts of Indonesia and China but this only proves that we have a culture of our own.

Coffins are made of hollowed out log normally carved by the elderly Igorots before they die, each cadaver was smoked throughout the 5-day pre-burial feast to avoid fast decomposition. Hanging the coffins in high elevated cliffs is the traditional way of burying a qualified individual. The indigenous death ritual also involves pushing the bodies into the tight spaces of the coffin for them to fit into the coffin space made from Pine tree logs.

This ancient practice in Sagada was already more than 2,000-year-old tradition. Although it was no longer a common practice for locals of Sagada, the latest addition to the hanging coffins of Sagada was placed there last June 2008.

View of a Rocky Hill from Echo Valley Sagada
View of a Rocky Hill from Echo Valley Sagada
Zoomed Photo of Hanging Coffins in Sagada
Zoomed Photo of Hanging Coffins in Sagada
Sagada hanging coffins
Sagada hanging coffins
The Hanging Coffins of Echo Valley, Sagada in Mountain Province
The Hanging Coffins of Echo Valley, Sagada in Mountain Province

The Igorot ancestors in Sagada believed that the higher your body is laid – the close they are to ‘heaven’. Another reason was to protect the bodies from natural disasters like earthquakes and floods and also to keep the corpses away from wild animals.

The way how they managed to settle the coffins in this high elevated cliffs was still a mystery for me, In this world of never-ending discovery and new technology, the old way of doing everything seems more appealing to me. The ancient way of burying the dead in Sagada have been slowly disappearing but their descendants are still continuing other traditions and I believe the Igorot hospitality is part of it.

Sagada Parish Center
Sagada Parish Center
Sagada Parish Church
Sagada Parish Church

My Sagada experience is more than just a road trip and gastronomic adventure, It was also a short cultural immersion and a fantastic way to commune with nature. More than its mystique charm, Sagada’s best attraction is not the cold weather but it’s friendly people. Just like the Ivatan’s of Batanes, Igorots of Mountain Province are one the friendliest people I’ve met during my travels.

How to Get To Sagada From Manila

Direct routes from Manila to Sagada are now available through the services of Coda Lines Corporation. The company offers a daily trip from Cubao terminal to Sagada. The daily schedule of departure is at 8 in the evening and estimated travel time of 12 hours. Fares start at Php 760. Contact Mobile 0927 559 2197/ 0929 521 3229 for inquiries.

Also Read: Travel Guide: How to Get to Sagada from Metro Manila

Check out our complete list of recommended Hotels in Sagada via Agoda or you may also see available Airbnb properties in the city.

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9 COMMENTS

  1. Nice shots. Those hanging coffins look scary but it’s amazing. How did they put it over there? Too bad the tradition is dying? 🙁
    Thanks for sharing this anyway..ü

  2. According to the oldest igorot in Sagada working in their tourism office, namely mang haime as they call him. They put the coffins up to the cliff to make it sacred and to prevent the coffins from being ruined by people who aren’t living in Sagada and couldn’t understand this tradition. In addition he added up that they never had an idea that heaven and hell do exist not until the church were established during 1802 (if im not mistaken about the year). So when they built the hanging coffins their intention was not to put the coffins there high to get closer to heaven.

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