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Top 8 Beach Destinations near Metro Manila

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Looking for Beach Destinations near Metro Manila?

Living in Metro Manila, apart from its malls or similar recreational facilities can be a gloomy experience for everybody. While though I am not referring to gloom as a literal result of air pollution with its dark and hazy effects to environment, I meant it as one which anyone would find more gloom if you look it at its waters perspective – polluted waters due to trash and pollution – which gives anyone especially those who likes clear, safe to swim waters reason to be so. But being a common scenario already in the metro, the feeling is barely noticeable.

The environment throughout the most part of the metro speaks for itself and which no person who has been to the place cannot state as a lie, but a truth. Not intended as derogatory, this post is meant to highlight reasons to rejoice what may have been lacking if you are in the metro. As such, the following list down the top 8 beach destinations near Metro Manila.


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Nagsasa Beach (photo by JP via Flickr)
Nagsasa Beach (photo by JP via Flickr)

#1: Nagsasa Cove

Where: San Antonio, Zambales

Why: Apart from being economically-friendly for the common individuals with admission fees amounting to only 50 pesos for a day trip or 100 pesos for an overnight stay, Nagsasa Cove in Zambales is a scenic location which is an ideal place for anyone who would like to take a break from the busy life at the metro for its tranquility. However, boats to Nagsasa Cove will cost you around 1,500 pesos or 600 pesos per head which also includes a side trip to Anawangin Cove and Capones Island. Nagsasa Cove is best described for its gray shore which is fringed by agoho trees.

Cagbalete Island (photo by 10nisboy via Flickr)
Cagbalete Island (photo by 10nisboy via Flickr)

#2: Cagbalete Island

Where: Mauban, Quezon

Why: In a direct statement coming from an avid traveler, Rogelio “Gabz” Gabiano, Jr. mentioned Cagbalete Island as: “Cagbalete Island is famous for the occurrence of low tide where water can recede up to one kilometer from the shore, exposing its compact white sand, corals and rocks.” It is best described as a collision between azure waters and dessert-like terrain whose tranquility is an option away from the metro. Getting to Cagbalete Island requires you to either charter a boat at a starting rate of 1,500 pesos at Mauban port or board a passenger boat to the island on its two trips a day travels to the island for a lesser 50 pesos only. An environmental fee amounting to 30 pesos and a terminal fee amounting to 40 also apply.

Capones Island (photo by GreenArcher04 via Flickr)
Capones Island (photo by GreenArcher04 via Flickr)

#3: Capones Island

Where:San Antonio, Zambales

Why: Getting to this place is synonymous to getting to Nagsasa Cove and Anawangin Cove respectively for its trip package of 1,500 pesos or 600 pesos per head offer by hiring a boat at the Pundaquit Beach. Having untamed waves crashing on its craggy shores, Capones Island may not be ideal for some as a place for swimming. However, what sets it apart from its neighboring islands is its topography. In addition to its already picturesque landscapes is Faro de Punta Capones, the old colonial lighthouse which adds more drama to the place.

Burot Beach (photo by PonderingPaodaolei.net)
Burot Beach (photo by PonderingPaodaolei.net)

#4: Burot Beach

Where: Calatagan, Batangas

Why: Devoid of any resorts or establishments, getting to Burot Beach in Calatagan, Batangas with foods and a tent in the backpack is ideal. Contrary to the previously mentioned beach destinations, chartering a boat to get to the place is completely unneeded which saves anyone the trouble to worry about additional expenses for such and possible seasickness. Its entrance, however, requires you to pay 130 pesos. Exploring the nearby sandbar may require you to pay 300 pesos for the boat to take you there of which Kirk Acebron, a travel enthusiast warns: “It can get quite crowded though during holidays and summer.

Anawangin Cove (photo by KirkAnatomy.com)
Anawangin Cove (photo by KirkAnatomy.com)

#5: Anawangin Cove

Where: San Antonio, Zambales

Why: As a result of the eruption of Mount Pinatubo back in the days, Anawangin Cove in Zambales, had a massive makeover. Volcanic ashes coming from the volcano turned the sands into gray and agoho trees which are often mistaken as pine trees were mushroomed along its coast. On here you will be able to hike a hill nearby for an uninterrupted view of the cobalt sea and neighboring cove. Similar to Nagsasa Cove and Capones Island, one can get to Anawangin Cove by paying 1,500 pesos or 600 pesos per head at a chartering boat from Pundaquit Beach. Other boatmen includes a side trip to the mentioned places for the same fee.

Related Article: How to get to Anawangin Cove from Manila

Cabongaoan Beach (photo by Pulencio via Flickr)
Cabongaoan Beach (photo by Pulencio via Flickr)

#6: Cabongaoan Beach

Where: Burgos, Pangasinan

Why: If you are the type of person whose ideal place for a holiday vacation is devoid of tourists, then look no further than in Burgos, Pangasinan. This town in Pangasinan is home to Cabaoangan Beach with its sun-sparkled cerulean waters fringed with coconut trees. John Marx Velasco, a traveler who once been into the place, had this to share: “The sand is white and a little fine. The shore isn’t flat as what the usual beach looks like but that’s totally okay. The weather, the beach itself and the people I’m with made this beach perfect for a great summer getaway.” Getting here can be as simple as renting a tricycle from Burgos Town for a one-way trip amounting to 500 pesos.

Borawan Beach (photo by Borawan Beach FB Page)
Borawan Beach (photo by Borawan Beach FB Page)

#7: Borawan Beach

Where: Padre Burgos, Quezon

Why: A booming tourist magnet, Padre Burgos’ Borawan Beach is becoming a flock for travelers because of its affordable yet interesting beach flanked by mountains by abundant jungles. Lapping the coast of Barangay Lipata is Borawan Beach. As one of the first to introduced the place online a few years back, Claire Raborar-Blaxland, a mommy explorer had this to say for the place: “The beach doesn’t really have that fine powdery white sand of Boracay and the limestone isn’t as grand as those I have seen in El Nido. But to have a hint of both in one place is probably what makes Borawan Beach uniquely beautiful.” Boats to Borawan can be chartered for 800 pesos and its entrance fee is 80 pesos with a tent rental of 500 pesos. To save you some money, it is advised that one should bring a tent to only pay for the tent pitching of 200 pesos.

Potipot Island (photo by Potipot Island FB Page)
Potipot Island (photo by Potipot Island FB Page)

#8: Potipot Island

Where: Uacon, Candelaria, Zambales

Why: A good beach destination for those who are tight on the budget yet wanting a place of retreat from the metro. Comparable to popular destinations in the country namely Boracay, Panglao and Palawan, Potipot Island is a “dirt cheap” escapade from the metro as some may describe it for its price. Potipot Island in Zambales is a place to be for its sun shine. Traveler to the place Jherson Jaya had this to say: “The island did not fail me though it didn’t exceed my expectation. Potipot is perfect for beach bumming. It is comparable to the white sands of Boracay, Panglao, and Palawan. Though the dried sea grass on the shore makes it looks a dirty beach still its powdery white sand will entice you to roll your beach body and cover yourself with white sand.” Boat fare may only costs you 400 pesos and entrance fee of 100 pesos (day tour) or 300 pesos (overnight).

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