Aichi Prefecture Day Three: A Historical Walking Tour

flight of stairs leading to the Shinpuku-ji Temple
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Aichi Prefecture Day 3: A Historical Walking Tour

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It was just other day when I came to Japan for my Aichi Prefecture tour. It was already our third day in Aichi, before I knew it. Time flew as fast as the chilly autumn wind that accompanied us in our tours.

We started our third day in Aichi earlier than the previous two days. We had to visit the two cities of Okazaki and Tokoname, and we had to maximize the whole day.

Early Morning at Okazaki Temple
Early Morning at Okazaki Temple

The bus ride to Okazaki was peaceful, and I was able to see the Rising Sun brighten up the sky from the bus window.

Japanese Castle Themed Telephone Booth
Japanese Castle Themed Telephone Booth

Our first stop for the day was Okazaki Park in the Okazaki Castle grounds. The castle was built in 1455, and afterwards rebuilt in 1531, as a fortress to symbolize Okazaki City. Although it is a popular tourist spot, there were only a few people because we arrived earlier than expected. Our group was just silently heading to the Ieyasu and Mikawa Bushi Museum, when suddenly… a pair of samurais greeted us with a spectacular battle performance!

 Statue of Honda Tadakatsu inside Okazaki Park
Statue of Honda Tadakatsu inside Okazaki Park

The samurais are part of the group called “The Great Ieyasu Aoi Busho Tai”. They were clad with full armor and very authentic-looking swords. Their battle reminded me of the one I saw in Nagoya Castle from before, but I found this one much more intimate and entertaining because there were very few people around. As a man who grew up with action anime series, this experience truly fascinated me. My childhood screamed “Banzai!” as I watched the pair.

Ieyasu Aoi Busho Tai Performance
Ieyasu Aoi Busho Tai Performance
Okazaki Castle
Okazaki Castle

After the performance, we headed to the Ieyasu and Mikawa Bushi Museum. The museum was built in honor of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa shogunate, as well as in honor of the Mikawa Bushi warriors of the Matsudaira clan that once ruled over Aichi Prefecture before the present day. The museum is housed in a very traditional Japanese building. The area was very well-kept, perhaps symbolizing the discipline of the samurais that once roamed the land.

Flight of stairs leading to the top of Okazaki Castle
Flight of stairs leading to the top of Okazaki Castle

We also explored most floors of the Okazaki Castle itself. The castle was almost like a museum, with each floor telling a story of the past. There were telescopes at the top floor, but even without looking through the lens, the view was beautiful enough for us to get a glimpse of the city.

View from the top of Okazaki Castle
View from the top of Okazaki Castle

We left the castle grounds after a while (we had to use the stairs from top to bottom floor. Cardio exercise for me!), and proceeded to the Maruya Hatcho Miso Factory nearby.

Miso is a traditional Japanese seasoning made from soybeans, and is oftentimes used to make sauces, spreads, and most especially, a nice, hot bowl of miso soup. The Maruya Hatcho Miso Factory in Aichi is the oldest hatcho miso maker in Japan, with its operation starting since 1337 and continuing today!

Miso barrels inside Maruya Hatcho Miso Factory
Miso barrels inside Maruya Hatcho Miso Factory

We had a short tour of the factory and observed how miso is made. It’s just a small factory, and gave off an aura that will probably remind you of your grandmother’s bedroom: very cozy and faded with time.

Inside Maruya Hatcho Miso Factory Museum
Inside Maruya Hatcho Miso Factory Museum

Another centuries-old building that we went to afterwards is the Shinpuku-ji Temple. The Buddhist temple is the oldest in Aichi and is one of the oldest in the entire country: it’s built in the year 594. And indeed, stepping inside the temple grounds felt like being brought back in time in the 6th century.

View from the Shinpuku-ji Temple
View from the Shinpuku-ji Temple

There’s a huge flight of stairs leading to the Shinpuku-ji Temple, which is a common characteristic for Japanese temples (again, that’s a whole lot of cardio exercise for me!). Reaching the top of the stairs wasn’t too hard, however. The soft wind made by the surrounding grove of bamboos made everything very relaxing. We also saw a statue of Ikkyuu-san at the top of the stars, a Buddhist monk whom the Japanese pray to for wisdom. There is a red metal bridge at one side of the temple grounds. It’s connected to restrooms and a small souvenir shop (called omiyage shop in Japanese).

Red Bridge leading to Shinpuku-ji Temple Restaurant
Red Bridge leading to Shinpuku-ji Temple Restaurant
flight of stairs leading to the Shinpuku-ji Temple
flight of stairs leading to the Shinpuku-ji Temple
Red Bridge
Red Bridge

We had our lunch in the nearby restaurant that served bamboo-shoot cuisine. I imagined that they harvested the bamboos from the temple, if that’s allowed. Our lunch included tempura and a variety of boiled and pickled vegetables, and a tender helping of bamboo shoots.

bamboo-shoot cuisine
bamboo-shoot cuisine

After lunch, we headed to the second city for the day, Tokoname. Tokoname is famous for its pottery and ceramics. The city, however, is more known for one thing: the maneki-neko, or the ceramic lucky cats. If you’re from the Philippines, you would have probably seen a golden, battery-powered cat that waves its paw at you when you enter a local shop. A maneki-neko looks exactly like that.

maneki-neko lucky cats
maneki-neko lucky cats
Pottery Path
Pottery Path
Pottery Path Toko-Nyan Historical Walking Tour
Pottery Path Toko-Nyan Historical Walking Tour

Our first stop for the afternoon was Pottery Path Toko-Nyan, the heart of the maneki-neko. The Pottery Path is a hilly, 1.8-kilometer trail that passes along an elegantly quaint pottery village. We passed by the Dokan Zaka, a wall lined with pots and other earthenware. We also walked past the maneki-neko street that is, from the name, a road with hundreds of maneki-neko, all adorably wishing me a good luck!

Toko-nyan
Toko-nyan

Overlooking the maneki-neko street is the massive white Toko-nyan, which I imagined was the mother of all the maneki-neko.

It was a perfect and short afternoon walk. We saw a bunch of cafés and pot galleries on our way, where we bought our authentic Tokoname earthenware souvenirs.

Our next stop was INAX Live Museum, which showcased more of Tokoname’s earthenware and ceramic artworks. Our group visited the Terracotta Park, which showed us a creative way of using terracotta and ceramic tiles for decorative purposes.  We also checked out the Tile Museum, which showcased hundreds of very beautiful decorative ceramic tiles. There was an entire room whose walls were covered with textured tiles. Clay Works was another part of the museum that we visited. They offer packages that let visitors decorate clay balls.

Before leaving the museum, we did another batch of earthenware shopping from the souvenir shop. That was a perfect way to wrap up our Historical Walking Tour.

The sun had already set when we travelled to Nagoya City to rest for the day. We checked in at Castle Plaza Hotel Nagoya. After leaving our baggage, our group immediately proceeded to Sekai No Yamachan for dinner.

Sekai no Yamachan is an izakaya, a sort of gastropub. We had an excellent time while recounting our experiences for the day. We had fried chicken wings which are crispy, juicy, and greyed with salt and pepper. Also on our plates was doteni, pork intestine marinated in miso, which reminded us of our little tour earlier. They also served Japanese alcoholic drinks.

Sekai no Yamachan Spicy Chicken Wings
Sekai no Yamachan Spicy Chicken Wings
Japanese Hotdog
Japanese Hotdog
Waffle and Berries
Waffle and Berries

The casual atmosphere of the place was very relaxing, and our meal fully satisfied us for a good night’s sleep back at the hotel. We had a few more days to explore Aichi Prefecture.

This Heart of Japan Familiarization Tour was made possible by Tourism Bureau of Aichi Prefecture Government with the assistance of Vector Inc. (Japan) and YMV & Associates Inc. (Philippines).
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